Animal Pictures Archive
Animal Photo Album

New Photos Animal News Animal Sounds Animal Movies Upload Photo Copyright Korean
Funny Animal Photos Monsters in Animalia Wiki Articles   Fun Facts about Animals Links Home Mobile A.P.A.
Delete Modify    
Red-necked Wallaby (Macropus rufogriseus) - Wiki latin dict size=62   common dict size=512
Image Info Original File Name: Young_red_necked_wallaby-Bennett\'s Wallaby (Macropus rufogriseus).jpg Resolution: 1327x1991 File Size: 1394230 Bytes Date: 2007:03:16 15:33:44 Camera: DMC-FZ30 (Panasonic) F number: f/2.8 Exposure: 10/3200 sec Focal Length: 375/10 Upload Time: 2007:03:25 14:52:22
Author Name (E-mail): Unknown
Subject Red-necked Wallaby (Macropus rufogriseus) - Wiki

Red-necked Wallaby (Macropus rufogriseus) - Wiki; DISPLAY FULL IMAGE.
Email : E-Card | Poster | Web Master    Delete   Edit Info   Admin

Description
Red-necked Wallaby (Macropus rufogriseus) - Wiki

Red-necked Wallaby
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

[Photo] A young red-necked wallaby Macropus rufogriseus taken in near Ensay, Victoria, Australia. Taken by benjamint444 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User:benjamint444

The Red-necked Wallaby (Macropus rufogriseus) is a medium-sized macropod, common in the more temperate and fertile parts of eastern Australia. As one of the largest wallabies, it can easily be mistaken for a kangaroo. Males can weigh more than 20 kg and attain a head-body length of 90 cm.

Red-necked Wallabies are distinguished by their black nose and paws, white stripe on the upper lip, and grizzled medium grey coat with a reddish wash across the shoulders.

Red-necked Wallabies are found in coastal scrub and sclerophyll forest throughout coastal and highland eastern Australia, from Rockhampton, Queensland to the South Australian border; in Tasmania and on many of the Bass Strait islands (although it is unclear which of the islands have native populations as opposed to introduced ones).

In Tasmania, north-east New South Wales and coastal Queensland, their numbers have expanded over the past 30 years because of a reduction in hunting pressure and the partial clearing of forest to result in a mosaic of pastures where wallabies can feed at night, alongside bushland where they can shelter by day. For reasons not altogether clear, it is less common in Victoria.

There is a small colony of Red-necked Wallabies on the island of Inchconnachan, Loch Lomond in Scotland. This was founded in 1975 with two pairs taken from Whipsnade Zoo, and had risen to 26 individuals by 1993. There were at one time small colonies in England, in the Peak District and in Ashdown Forest. These are now believed to be locally extinct, though unconfirmed sightings are still reported from time to time.

Like most macropods, the Red-necked Wallaby is largely solitary, although loose groups, known as mobs, often share common feeding areas. They feed at night and, particularly on dull days, in the late afternoon, generally grazing on grass and herbs close to forest shelter.

There are two subspecies. The Tasmanian form, Macropus rufogriseus rufogriseus, also known as Bennett's Wallaby is smaller (as island species nearly always are), has longer, shaggier fur, and breeds in the late summer, mostly between February and April. They have adapted to living in proximity to humans and can be found grazing on lawns in the fringes of Hobart and other urban areas.

The mainland form, Macropus rufogriseus banksianus, breeds all year round. Interestingly, captive animals maintain their breeding schedules; Tasmanian females that become pregnant out of their normal season delaying birth until summer, which can be anything up to eight months later.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red-necked_Wallaby
The text in this page is based on the copyrighted Wikipedia article shown in above URL. It is used under the GNU Free Documentation License. You may redistribute it, verbatim or modified, providing that you comply with the terms of the GFDL.

Comments
Guest Delete
Bennett's Wallaby, Macropus rufogriseus

The Bennett's wallaby, known as the red-necked wallaby on mainland Australia, is one of the States's most commonly seen native animals. Visitors to most of our national parks are highly likely to encounter these animals during their stay.

Description
Often referred to as a kangaroo in Tasmania, males can weigh more than 20 kg and stand up to 1.5 m tall. They can be distinguished from the pademelon and Forester kangaroo by their black nose and paws, and white stripe on the upper lip.

Distribution
Bennetts wallabies are found throughout the state, including the Bass Strait islands. They are abundant in Tasmania - their numbers and distribution having expanded over the past 30 years. This is due to a reduction in hunting pressure and the clearing of forest to result in a mosaic of pastures where wallabies can feed at night, alongside bushland where they can shelter by day.


Diet and behaviour
The species is largely solitary, allthough loose groups, known as mobs, often share common feeding areas. They feed at afternoon and dusk, generally grazing on grass and herbs.

Breeding
There is a distinct breeding season, with births occuring late summer to early autumn. This is in contrast to mainland populations of the same species, where births occur year round. The gesatation period is 30 days. Pouch life is about 280 days and weaning occurs at 12-17 months.
Copyright Info AnimmalPicturesArchive.com does not have the copyright for this image. This photograph or artwork is copyright by the photographer or the original artist. If you are to use this photograph, please contact the copyright owner or the poster.

Search Major Animal Websites
Misidentified?
Need further identification?
Any comment?
Leave your message here.
Name :    PASSWORD :
Email :
 
Search
Back List Upload Home Korean
CopyLeft © since 1995, Animal Pictures Archive. All rights may be reserved.
Powered by KRISTAL IRMS   iPhotoScrap photo scrap album

Stats